EAA Standard Table

Research

Excuses to NOT build an airplane, and resolutions:

    1. Don’t have the time.
      Got time to watch TV eat chips and drink beer, therefore got time to build.
    2. Don’t have the money.
      America was built on credit.
    3. Don’t have the space.
      Bought house with 3 car garage last year.
    4. Don’t have the experience.
      Neither did the Wright brothers, and neither did most other homebuilders.
    5. Don’t fly enough to justify the cost.
      I also don’t swim enough to justify owning a pool, or drive offroad enough to justify a 4 wheel drive pickup with lifted suspension.
    6. Friends will think I am crazy/stupid/etc.
      Who cares? They already think that anyway.
    7. OK, OK. Got the space, got the time, I can read instructional books, equally crazy friends are already volunteering to help, and the credit card works. But I can’t even get started; the garage is a disaster area full of junk, and I don’t even have any worktables or anything.

Well, trash gets picked up twice a week…

AND… it seems bizarre that such a simple little minor thing can cause a cascade of events, but it is true. I was at the point where even if I did not build an airplane, I still needed some work tables for the garage for other projects around the house. But the solution didn’t seem clear; I didn’t want to spend a fortune on prebuilt tables (if I could even find some suitable ones), and I had no idea how to construct a decent table or even what size it should be.

So what solved this issue and pushed me over the edge?

The February 2001 issue of Sport Aviation magazine, published by the EAA. When I turned to page 101 and saw the article on how to build the EAA Chapter 1000 “Standard Worktable”, something just clicked. I decided that the simplicity, modularity and reusability of the 2×5 table was exactly what I needed.

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